Böcker lästa i september 2014

zweigStefan Zweig: Världen av i går.

Intressant och naturligtvis på många sätt skakande självbiografi av en jude som upplevt båda världskrigen. Man slås av hur oerhört internationella judarna var och vilken betydelse de skulle kunna ha för världsfreden genom sina kontakter överallt. Boken fungerar som komplement till Haren med bärnstensögon som jag läste nyligen.

 

Weir_MartianAndy Weir: The Martian.

Onekligen spännande och inte helt osannolik berättelse om en man som blir kvarlämnad på Mars för att tros vara död, och hur han klarar sig genom att syntetisera väte, göra vatten, odla potatis osv. Väl mycket sf av den gamla Gernsback-pedagogiska stilen, med långa beräkningar av hur länge han skulle klara sig. Och är det verkligen farligt med sandstormar när det praktiskt taget inte finns atmosfär? Men visst klart läsvärd, och utmärkt filmmanus.

 

burning-womanFrank Roger: The Burning Woman and other stories.

Underbart surrealistiska små korta noveller. Inte direkt sf utan snarare magisk realism. Författaren är en sf-fan jag brukar träffa på Eurocon och den här köpte jag av honom på Loncon 3.

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ashley_mike_transform_101bMichael Ashley: Transformations.

En intressant genomgång eller historik över sf-magasinen 1950-1970; på många sätt den viktigaste magasinperioden med de stora omvälvningarna under 60-talet. Naturligtvis kommer Ashley också in på sf-litteraturens utveckling generellt under denna tid.

 

Scatter_of_StardustE. C. Tubb: A Scatter of Stardust.

Välskrivna sf- och fantasynoveller från 50-talet.

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Kanada-Richard-FordRichard Ford: Kanada.

Trots att handlingens klimax redan berättas i första meningen är detta familjedrama spännande och intressant hela vägen, och språket är riktigt vackert både i den svenska översättningen och i originalet som jag testade ibland.

 

Conquer_ChaosJohn Brunner: To Conquer Chaos.

Spännande liten postapokalyptisk sf-berättelse med en hel del psi-krafter (den är skriven 1963) men ändå hyggligt trovärdig handling (nåja, det läcker in monster genom en port till andra världar) och en söt liten romans.

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9780399160547HFred Nadis: The Man From Mars. Ray Palmer’s Amazing Pulp Journey.

En fantastisk biografi om en fantastisk sf-fan, författare, redaktör och kvalificerad galning, som trots att han bröt ryggen vid 7 års ålder kom att ha både familjeliv, vänner och avgörande inflytande på sf- och ufo-världarna. Han var redaktör för Amazing Stories när den var som sämst, men han publicerade också noveller av Bradbury, E F Russell och Sturgeon – den senare med den första sf-novellen som var någorlunda positiv till homosexualitet. Helt klart nödvändig läsning för varje sf-fan!

Böcker lästa i augusti 2014

uk-orig-before-they-are-hangedJoe Abercrombie: Before They Are Hanged.

Efter att verkligen ha uppskattat den första delen, The Blade Itself, blev detta en besvikelse. Humorn som i första delen gjorde våldet uthärdligt saknades till stor del så att det bara blev tröttsamt. En udda kärlekshistoria var det som ändå gjorde att boken var någorlunda.

 

trollmarknad-och-andra-dikterChristina Rosetti: Trollmarknad och andra dikter.

En liten diktbok med trevliga 1800-talsdikter, dikten “Trollmarknad” lätt fantastikmässig.

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my-brief-historyStephen Hawking: My Brief History.

Självbiografi med en hel del modern fysik som inte alltid är så lätt att begripa. En imponerande livshistoria är det i alla fall.

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AlbaKristina Hård: Alba.

Modern svensk sf med klassiskt tema, rymdfärd till annan planet med intelligenta varelser och konflikt med dem. Intressanta personer, hygglig politik och spännande handling. Jag hade riktigt trevligt.

Loncon 3 / 72th Worldcon

London, UK, August 14-18, 2014

My wife Margareta and I stayed at Travelodge London City Airport but had not been able to find a reasonable flight to that airport from Arlanda, so we spent the day travelling. At Paddington we got our tickets for the train and ferry for Dublin, actually with much less trouble than I had expected. The final part of the trip was by DLR – the somewhat futuristic Docklands Light Railway. The hotel was OK and fairly close to the convention. We went directly to the venue and since this was Wednesday we did not have to stand in the long queues which we saw on Thursday. ExCel was well suited for the convention although the programme rooms were a bit too small and sometimes the most popular items were in the smallest room. This was especially problematic in the very beginning of the convention when there were few parallel programme items.

Crossing Boundaries: Histories of International SF/F for Children

Catharine Butler, K V Johansen, Michael Levy, Sanna Lehtonen, Patricia Kennan (M)

Catharine Butler, K V Johansen, Michael Levy, Sanna Lehtonen, Patricia Kennan (M)

Michael Levy, an American who teaches sf and children’s literature, had never heard of Enid Blyton, but Harry Potter had amazed American kids.  The reason for the success was considered to be the agreement with the American stereotypes of the British. Regarding stories by Native Americans the question was asked whether it is fantasy if the author actually believes in supernatural phenomena, and this was resolved by the concept “Consensus reality”. What is incredible for kids can be real and vice versa. In order to make them more credible the books are sometimes changed during translation: The Finnish version of Tarzan of the Apes was converted to Tarzan of the Bears. In American adaptations of British books pounds is changed into dollars and madam to mam, which was considered strange. Should difficult words be explained or changed? Children’s vocabulary is expanded by words they do not understand, but the text must still be understandable.

The World at Worldcon: Nordic SF/F

John-Henri Holmberg, Anna Davour, Marianna Leikomaa, Tore Høie (M), Sini Neuvonen

John-Henri Holmberg, Anna Davour, Marianna Leikomaa, Tore Høie (M), Sini Neuvonen

To a large extent this discussion became a listing of authors in the different Nordic countries. The basic literature in Finland is very realistic, and the Finnish SF/F authors are friends and discuss with each other. Johanna Sinisalo has written a retelling of Kalevala. Examples of new Finnish SF/F can be downloaded and found in the anthology It Came from the North. Other web sites with information on Finnish and international SF/F are Partial Recall and Rising Shadows.

John-Henri Holmberg mentioned an interesting distinction between two kinds of SF in Sweden, made by Ulrika Nolte in a German thesis described in the Sweden entry of the SF Encyclopedia. One kind was written by Swedish sf fans in a tradition coming mainly from American and British sf magazines and the stories published in the corresponding Swedish magazines, and includes authors as Sam J. Lundwall, Bertil Mårtensson, Maths Claesson etc. The other kind Nolte called “social fiction” and entails dystopian fiction written since the 1930’s by established Swedish authors like Karin Boye, Tora Dahl and Harry Martinson. This has not previously been noted as a trend. John-Henri also pointed out the reason for the fantasy boom in Sweden in the 1990’s: The first popularity list based on sales instead of criticism was published in 1993.

It was also noted during the discussion that in the Nordic countries we do not read each other’s books. This is sad since there is a lot of good SF/F published at least in Denmark, and Danish is really easy to read even if it is not so easy to listen to. Most Swedes cannot understand Finnish.

Fandom in Fiction

Virginia Preston, Audrey Taylor, Erin Horakova, Lisa Macklem (M)

Virginia Preston, Audrey Taylor, Erin Horakova, Lisa Macklem (M)

Since I have enjoyed Diana Wynne Jones’ Deep Secret, Sharyn McCrumb’s Bimbos of the Death Sun and Zombies of the Gene Pool and several other stories where fandom and fan conventions are described I was curious about this programme item. However, I was somewhat disappointed since the four women on the panel mainly talked about funny scenes on some tv sitcoms that I have not seen (and would surely not have appreciated). In addition to the novels above they mentioned Jo Walton’s Among Others and Fallen Angels by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle and Michael Flynn. Ahrvid Engholm pointed out the masterpiece of fan writing The Enchanted Duplicator, but there was no mention of e g Barry Malzberg or the recent Osama by Lavie Tidhar which gives a very accurate and entertaining description of a fan convention.

Speculative Biology – An Introduction

This was actually four short lectures with Power Point presentations, and was quite entertaining. The moderator Lewis Dartnell pointed out that the colour of plants is complementary to the colour of the light from the sun, and could thus be quite different from green on other planets. Planets with high gravity might be expected to have balloon plants filled with gas. The convergent evolution of eyes on Earth indicates that the evolution on Earth can be used to predict that on other planets. Darren Naish talked about future or alternative animals on Earth and mentioned an early (1961) book by the pseudonymous Harald Stümpke, in English called The Snouters. He also talked about books by Dougal Dixon who was also present in the panel and whose After Man contains pictures of possible future animals.

Governing the Future

Charles E. Gannon, Nicholas Whyte (M), John-Henri Holmberg, Justin Landon, Liz Gorinsky, Farah Mendlesohn

Charles E. Gannon, Nicholas Whyte (M), John-Henri Holmberg, Justin Landon, Liz Gorinsky, Farah Mendlesohn

Earlier (50s, 60s) SF was essentially positive towards government but today it is either completely outside the story or is described as a failure. According to John-Henri Asimov was a welfare socialist and his robot stories promoted advanced welfare ideas. The cyberpunk authors reran the youth revolt of 1968 that they had experienced when they were 17-18 years; it is clearly anti-government. Europeans are more pro-government than Americans.

Books by Cory Doctorow and Nalo Hopkinson were classified as dystopias by Farah Mendlesohn, and YA dystopias are everywhere.  An example is The Diary of Pelly D by L J Adlington. The book Farah edited as a protest against censorship, Glorifying Terrorism, is now out of print.

In a Proprietary World Who Owns Your Body?

Carolina Gómez Lagerlöf, Simon Ings, Simon Bradshaw (M), Jody Lynn Nye, Richard Ashcroft, Joan Paterson

Carolina Gómez Lagerlöf, Simon Bradshaw (M), Jody Lynn Nye, Richard Ashcroft, Joan Paterson

After some discussion on the ethics of surrogate mothers and transplanting livers to alcoholics a lot of time was spent on HeLa

Simon Ings

Simon Ings

cells and the book about the patient who provided these cells from the beginning, Henrietta Lacks. I find it absolutely bizarre that a patient or her relatives could claim ownership to results obtained in research done on cells from a removed cancer. Finally there was a discussion on a possible development of AIs that help Alzheimer patients – who would own the AI when the patient dies?

Hard Right

Jaine Fenn, David G Hartwell, Neyir Cenk Gokce (M), Charles E Gannon, Alison Sinclair

Jaine Fenn, David G Hartwell, Neyir Cenk Gokce (M), Charles E Gannon, Alison Sinclair

Alison Sinclair is an author of four sf novels (I have read the somewhat juvenile but entertaining Legacies) and 5 fantasy novels, and she is an MD with an interest in evidence-based medicine. Charles E Gannon is the author of the Nebula-nominated novel Fire With Fire, and David G Hartwell has edited sf anthologies and written a history of hard sf. Jaine Fenn is the author of books in the Hidden Empire series, of which I have read the first two. She is liberal, not right.

The programme item was caused by an article by Paul Kincaid who argued that since hard sf depends on a world with inviolate rules it might have similarities with right-wing politics. The panel acknowledged that military technology always is popular in hard sf which could thus be right-wing. Politicised science as e g creationism is also right-wing, but Lysenkoism was popular in Soviet.  Space Opera might be considered right-wing, and Bank’s Culture novels was his project to save SO for the left.

Analog prints much hard sf, and Hartwell considered half of it to be crap whereas the other half can be superb. The core readers are technologists, not scientists.

Constructing Genre History

Takayuki Tatsumi, Gary Wolfe (M), Suanna Davis, Maureen Kincaid Speller, Ginjer Buchanan

Takayuki Tatsumi, Gary Wolfe (M), Suanna Davis, Maureen Kincaid Speller, Ginjer Buchanan

The average reader is thought not to care about the history of sf. It might be necessary for editors, and an sf teacher said that it is important for her students.  History can act as a gate-keeper if it is thought that you have to read a lot of old books in order to understand the present ones. On the other hand there is an ongoing conversation between authors in their work. This was especially so in the works of Heinlein and Asimov, but even Frankenstein is in the dialogue today. The adaptation of Lukianos, Thomas Moore etc into the sf canon was a way to defend sf, which is no longer necessary since it is not considered odd any more. Paul Kincaid’s blog with its timeline was recommended for those interested in the history.

The discussion turned into descriptions of personal histories of sf reading. When she was young Ginjer Buchanan found almost no sf in the library, only fantasy. She would recommend Alfred Bester rather than Heinlein to new readers and writers. Maureen Kincaid Speller found C S Lewis and Alan Garner in her local library and read a lot of children’s fantasy.

An Anthology of One’s Own

Alisa Krasnostein, Alex Dally McFarlane, Julia Rios (M), Jeanne Gomoll, Ann Vandermeer

Alisa Krasnostein, Alex Dally McFarlane, Julia Rios (M), Jeanne Gomoll, Ann Vandermeer

Pamela Sargent’s three Women of Wonder anthologies had different viewpoints and are a good beginning for finding sf by women. There were also women writers in the 17th century, e g Margaret Cavendish who wrote a feminist utopia in 1666, and the author Frances Stevens (real name Gertrude Barrows Bennett) wrote weird tales in the early 19th century which had a huge influence on H P Lovecraft. McFarlane has edited The Mammoth Book of SF Stories by Women which contains recent work by women and intends to capture what is happening now. Justine Larbalestier’s books were also recommended, and the June 2014 issue of Lightspeed Magazine, Women Destroy Science Fiction appears interesting.

Content and Form: Writing SF/F in non-Western Modes

Nick Wood, Aliette de Bodard, Amal El-Mohtar (M), Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, J Y Jang

The male white narrative has to be changed so that the centre is set in e g South-East Asia. This means that the surroundings have to be described in detail, otherwise the reader thinks the story is set in England. The Western paradigm has to be seen as one of many.

Stories from the Philippines are often communal and stem from oral traditions. Loenen-Ruiz pointed out that the colonial feeling has to be thrown off. The Western notion that there has to be a conflict in a story should also be challenged.

Interview with John Clute

Jonathan Clements, John Clute

Jonathan Clements, GoH John Clute

Jonathan Clements asked questions in a humorous way. In addition to the usual answers about life and career we got some information on Clute’s ideas. He defends spoilers in reviews. It is intellectual treason not to mention the end of a story. He also defended his introduction of the word “Fantastika” as a collective term for non-realistic literature – just as we already do in Swedish fandom. Fantastika should not contain metaphors, and an example is his novel Appleseed. He says that every sentence in it makes sense.

Finally he recommended Edward James’ exhibition about authors who took part in World War I, that could be seen in the Dealer’s Room and also on the web.

Classics in Speculative Fiction

The major problem with the presentations in the Academic Track was that the authors read their papers rapidly and without contact with the audience. Frances Foster’s “Lands of the Dead in Speculative Fiction” compared ancient heroic journeys like The Odyssey with the modern LeGuin’s Earthsea and Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief. The German Sibylle Machat made an excellent presentation of her paper “Ancient Philosophers as Characters in Post-Apocalyptic Science Fiction”. Bernard Beckett’s Genesis (2006) is set in Plato’s Republic and the conflict between church and science in Robert Charles Wilson’s Julian Comstock has similarities with the conflict between Hellenistic paganism and the Roman church that Julian the Apostate was involved in in the 4th century. Liz Gloyn’s “A Common Thread: Representations of the Minotaur in London” failed to interest me and lacked connections to speculative fiction.

SF: What It Is, What It Could Be

Jeanne Gomoll, Tobias Buckell, Stephanie Saulter (M), Alastair Reynolds, Ramez Naam

Jeanne Gomoll, Tobias Buckell, Stephanie Saulter (M), Alastair Reynolds, Ramez Naam

This panel spent a lot of time on the eternal question why sf is not respected, exemplified as usual with Margaret Atwood who reputedly not considers her books as sf. However, I think her book about sf was fairly positive. Reynolds pointed out the two traditions – Wells and Shelley’s Frankenstein are just a part of general literature, whereas the pulps defined a new line (reminds me of the two kinds of sf in Sweden).

Fantasy vs SF: Is the Universe Looking Out for You?

Stephen Hunt (M), Anne Lyle, Ian R McLeod, Robert Reed, Rebecka Levine

Stephen Hunt (M), Anne Lyle, Ian R McLeod, Robert Reed, Rebecka Levine

One reason for going to Woldcons is of course to listen to authors. I have read many stories by Robert Reed and I have really liked his short stories and been less impressed by his “great space ship stories”. He now told that these stories tend to be more static or conservative than the short stories. SF is considered to be about change whereas fantasy is static. McLeod said that sf is basically one-volume works, since if you want to have change it is very difficult to have it in several volumes. Fantasy may be more engaged with the characters. The tropes used might determine if it is sf or fantasy. However, it is easier to make a dragon than a FTL ship.

The Politics of Utopia

Kim Stanley Robinson, Kathleen Ann Goonan, David Farnell (M), Adrian Hon, Maureen Kincaid Speller, Christina Lake

Kim Stanley Robinson, Kathleen Ann Goonan, David Farnell (M), Adrian Hon, Maureen Kincaid Speller, Christina Lake

Utopian fiction lacks descriptions of how to get there from here. They are often boring, but this is not true of Banks’ Culture novels which have conflicts with other parties at the edges. Challenges for utopias are human nature – people want to have more than others, and there are problems with market economy that underprices natural resources even if this may be democratic. Longevity might increase how natural resources are valued.

Nebula to Interzone: British SF Magazines of the 1950s, 60s and 70s

Malcolm Edwards, Robert Silverberg, Stephen Baxter, Curt Phillips, Gillian Redfearn (M)

Malcolm Edwards, Robert Silverberg, Stephen Baxter, Curt Phillips, Gillian Redfearn (M)

This was probably the most entertaining and rewarding panel I listened to. The GoH Malcolm Edwards showed some of the 14 different magazines that were published in Britain in 1954. Robert Silverberg told that Nebula was the first magazine to publish one of his stories. He liked the magazine with its attractive, archaic typography, which he got shipped to him by Ken Slater. The editor Peter Hamilton was 20 years at that time. His first stories were published as by Bob Silverberg, but Randall Garrett told him that Bob doesn’t look good on the Table of Contents. Silverberg also told about his visit to Loncon 1 in 1957 by air which took 12 h. There were 268 members at the convention.

In its prime Nebula printed 30 – 40 000 copies. The stories were pretty good, and Hamilton was a post-war reader in contrast to

Robert Silverberg

Robert Silverberg

Ted (John) Carnell who edited New Worlds. His taste had been shaped in the 30s. When Nebula folded Peter Hamilton left the sf field altogether.

Authentic was for a time edited by Ted (E. C.) Tubb who was very active. He wrote pretty good stories with quick action. When he wrote what he wanted he was very British. One example is his first novel, Saturn Patrol. The scientist Bert (Herbert) Campbell had started Authentic that had been called Science Fiction Fortnightly for a period. It was equal to New Worlds and had often American authors. Silverberg had stories in Authentic.

In the 50s magazines were replaced by books, first paperbacks and then hardcovers. Another reason for the death of the magazines in USA was that the distributor American News Company folded in 1958. Astounding, Galaxy and F&SF had other distributors and survived.

The World at Worldcon: French and Francophone SF/F

Elizabeth Vonarburg, Antoine Rouaud, Pierre Pevel, Tom Clegg (M), Bradford Lyau, Eric Senabre, Laurence Suhner

Elizabeth Vonarburg, Antoine Rouaud, Pierre Pevel, Tom Clegg (M), Bradford Lyau, Eric Senabre, Laurence Suhner

Since there was no blackboard or projector which could have been used it was very difficult to get the names of authors mentioned in this panel. It was also problematic that one of the participants did not speak English and relied on the moderator for translation. Clegg asked what stories had made an impact when the panellists were 14, and the answers included Jules Verne, Perry Rhodan, Michael Moorcock, Isaac Asimov etc. No fantasy was written in French. An interesting observation by Laurence Suhner was that Swiss SF/F has been influenced by myths and tales and the dangerous nature. This appears similar to the situation in Finland.

French SF/F can be found translated into English at Blackcoat Press, and the author Yves Ménard writes in English. Solaris is a Canadian francophone SF/F magazine, and in France there are Galaxie and Bifrost.

What is Science?

Andrew Jaffe, Richard Dunn, Richard Ashcroft (M), Ada Palmer, Anthony Fucilla

Andrew Jaffe, Richard Dunn, Richard Ashcroft (M), Ada Palmer, Anthony Fucilla

Unfortunately this discussion took place in the smallest room of the convention that in addition had windows in two directions and thus became awfully hot especially since it was very crowded. One of the panellists, Anthony Fucilla, had to leave after a while since he felt unwell. This was unfortunate since his view of science was ancient: Science should be used to prove that God exists.

Ada Palmer is a historian of the Renaissance and Enlightenment and told that in the 17th century there was no difference between philosophy and science. Da Vinci worked for the Duke and no collaboration was allowed. Bacon’s view was that science and religion should cooperate in order to improve the world. Authority has been replaced by empirism, and this change took mainly place in Galilei’s time. She also advocated teaching of scientific method in other courses than science, e g history.

Richard Dunn is a historian of Science who listed some boundary cases of different kinds like economics, string theory and acupuncture. Discussions are essential and result in consensus which is as close to truth as we can come.  The cosmologist Andrew Jaffe considered that science involves data gathering and forming of hypotheses. Most of the time scientific orthodoxy is right, and random things happen all the time. To sort this out can be difficult, and there can be bias when scientists stop doing experiments when the theory has been validated. An example given was a demonstration of gravity waves which was first believed to be true until it was revealed that false data had been injected.

A professor of Bioethics, Richard Ashcroft, warned against misinterpretations of large datasets which can show correlations although there is no causation, as is quite popular in the newspapers.

The World at Worldcon: The state of British SF

Jo Fletcher, Simon Spanton, Glyn Morgan (M), Lesley Hall, Paul March-Russell

Jo Fletcher, Simon Spanton, Glyn Morgan (M), Lesley Hall, Paul March-Russell

What has changed since last Worldcon in UK 2005? The recession made life difficult for publishers, and at the same time there was an explosion of new authors. Book chains have gone down and mainstream publishers went down, giving room for small SF/F publishers and ebooks. Thus, the field has not narrowed. The diversity has increased, since Britain now is very diverse. Labelling of books can be narrowing, e g New Weird, but booksellers need the labels.

What is impressing? Chris Beckett, especially his short story collection that has a cross-over appeal and has been praised by the general public.

The community, fandom, has been good but nobody else hears the discussions. The market listens to cultural assessments. Dr Who fans might come to cons and see the novels, but there is a marginal overlap between visual and literature readers. Still it is extraordinary that people read as much as they do. They read on iPhones which are always there. People still want a story.

Academia’s reception of sf has possibly improved slightly. It is possible to get support for conventions and loads of students want to do research in the field.

The Canon is Dead. What Now?

Kate Nepveu (M), Connie Willis, Joe Monti, Alvaro Zinos-Amaro, Chris Beckett

Kate Nepveu (M), Connie Willis, Joe Monti, Alvaro Zinos-Amaro, Chris Beckett

Like in the discussion of Genre History, most panellists had their own canons. Thus Chris Beckett had read sf from the 60s onward, and found most of it in his dad’s shelf. Connie Willis defended the general canon and at Clarion she told the members 50 classic sf stories they should read. One reason is that she does not want to read stories with an excellent idea that she has to confess was used already by Bradbury. Another reason is that some gimmicks should not be used again, and a third that the old stories really are good. An example of a book that suffers from lack of knowledge of the sf canon is John Updike’s Toward the End of Time.

Beckett considered it to be optional for the reader to know the old works, but many in the panel found a pleasure in finding influences and dialogues with older books. Thus Stross’ Saturn’s Children is in dialogue with Asimov’s robot stories (and Heinlein’s Friday), Ancillary Justice reminds of The Left Hand of Darkness, and The Dark Material is a response to the Narnia books. Have Spacesuit Will Travel is a parody of earlier space operas. For a canon of short sf the panel recommended The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction, and Connie Willis lists her favourites on her blog.

We Can Rebuild You

Neil Clarke, Cherry Potts (M), Marieke Nijkamp, Tore Høie, Helen McCarthy

Neil Clarke, Cherry Potts (M), Marieke Nijkamp, Tore Høie, Helen McCarthy

This interesting panel raised more questions than it answered. SF usually does not represent disabled people, and the question is to what extent disabilities should be “cured”. This might just be a convenient way to tidy up. Aging can be seen as a disability whereas post-traumatic shock during World War I was not considered as such. Upgrades can be both from disabled and from “normal”, to superhuman.

Health records at hospitals and from implants can be misused if the security is incomplete, and leak to employers and insurance companies. Although security in hospitals is not a priority area it was felt that the benefits outweigh the problems and some privacy has to be sacrificed.

Two books on disabilities and prejudices: Elizabeth Moon’s Speed of Dark where treatment of autism leads to decrease in artistic ability, and Louis McMaster Bujold’s  books where spacers having four arms are subjected to prejudices.

Ian M Banks, Writer and Professional

John Jarrold, Andrew McKie, Ken MacLeod (M), Michelle Hodgson, David Haddock

This panel had been announced to be a discussion of the career and work of the recently deceased GoH, but the panellists mainly related anecdotes from their meetings with him. He was said to have had a slight OCD and was interested in minutiae. He seldom lost the thread and entertained in every sentence. His aim was to entertain strangers. His last work, The Quarry, written before his diagnosis is strangely enough about a man who knows he is dying of cancer.

The Culture was invented as a stage for his characters, and is a society that is really good. He was an atheist and a socialist and in favour of Scottish Independence – “Let England go”. The novels that the panel especially recommended were Use of Weapons, Player of Games, Feersum Endjinn, and Walking on Glass.

I Can’t Do That, Dave: artificial intelligence, imagination, and fear

Tony Ballantyne (M), Tricia Sullivan, Madeline Ashby, Timothy Anderson, Anthony Fucilla

From a robots’ point of view humans are slow meat, but according to Peter Watts the difference is not marked. The brain may still be better for a lot of purposes. Robots that are similar to people are inefficient. AIs are still given information; they cannot pick it up, and are so far less efficient than humans. Still, in the future it may be important to program them that we are special, since it is their definition that is important.

To grant citizenship to AIs is too early. There are still issues with women, aborigines etc. and when it becomes something to consider we have probably moved beyond states and citizenship. A superpact for AIs seems more likely.

Some books that were mentioned: Sarah Zettel’s Fool’s War, where AIs are downloaded into human bodies, Cory Doctorow’s Makers and Charles Stross’ Rule 34.

Interzone and Beyond: British SF magazines of the ‘80s, ‘90s and ‘00s

Gareth L Powell, Wendy Bradley, David Pringle, Malcolm Edwards, Chris Beckett (M)

Gareth L Powell, Wendy Bradley, David Pringle, Malcolm Edwards, Chris Beckett (M)

At the Eastercon in 1981 there was a profit which traditionally should be used for a party. Instead, the organisers proposed to start an sf magazine. At the same time a group in a London pub had the same idea, and the group of eight together started Interzone in 1982 (for details see link). Extro had started slightly before, but folded. Many authors started in Interzone: Stephen Baxter, Charles Stross, Geoff Ryman, Greg Egan, Chris Beckett, Eric Brown. Beckett was especially thankful for the extensive rejection letters which learnt him a lot. He corresponded with Interzone’s Lee Montgomery who he thought was a man, whereas she thought Chris was a woman.

Powell had no friends who read sf and for him Interzone was proof that there were others reading sf. Bradley considered Interzone to have been a bit depressing and blokey. For many years Pringle was the sole editor, and he told that the contributors mainly were British and not so much from USA and Canada. It tried to revive hard sf, “radical hard sf”, which was taken over by cyberpunk. The circulation was 5 – 6 000. The most gross and discussed story was Brian Aldiss’ Horsemeat.

There are now other outlets, e g online sites where people can read for free. It may be difficult to find the good stuff and there is a need for curated spaces, like ARC magazine and Strange Horizons. Today it is not possible to make a living from a magazine, nor from writing short stories.

London and Other Futures

Simon Ings, Anne Charnok, Dev Agarwal, Helen Pennington, Nick Hubble (M)

From this panel I have noted some books: The early (1885) post-apocalypse After London by Richard Jefferies and John Wyndham’s The Day of the Triffids with its blind people that has an intertextual connection to Wells’ “In the Country of the Blind”. Ken McLeod’s Intrusion describes an extrapolation of surveillance and Ings’ Headlong takes us to West London. Ballard’s The Flood appears to be set in London. I might add some that I have read recently: Ben Aaronovitch’s The Rivers of London and Chris Wooding’s The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray, but there are of course many more.

The Bottom Up: The Fantastical World of Human Waste

This late-night talk was given by Rachel Erickson who among other things works as a guide for tourists to find free toilets in London. This interest has led her to study the history of toilets, and she mentioned e g how urine was collected and used in the Roman Empire. A novel where faeces plays a major role is the satirical The Dark Light Years by Brian Aldiss.

When Genres Collide: Does SF/F have its own form?

Nick Harkaway, Peter Higgins, Amanda Bridgeman, Darlene Marshall, Duncan Lawie (M)

Nick Harkaway, Peter Higgins, Amanda Bridgeman, Darlene Marshall, Duncan Lawie (M)

Marshall writes romance and defines it as describing two people who meet and make a journey to a common destination. The panel considered sf to be more flexible than romance and mainstream, and considered Sense of Wonder to be specific for sf. A recent example is Ancillary Justice, and I fully agree. It makes you see things in a new and different view, and can push boundaries – “I did not expect that”. In general military sf and space opera are narrow and not as open as other sf.

If a story today is not sf it is instead historical: There are no emails, no sms etc. Interaction has become necessary. There is a weird resistance against acknowledging this in literature today. An author as Greg Bear is close to the now and thus to mainstream.

Critical Diversity: Beyond Russ and Delany

Aishwarya Subramanian, Erin Horakova, Andrew Butler (M), Liz Bourke, Fabio Fernandes

Aishwarya Subramanian, Erin Horakova, Andrew Butler (M), Liz Bourke, Fabio Fernandes

Contemporary queer criticism and criticism concerning marginalised groups can be found in writings by Kameron Hurley, Aishwarya Subramanian, Fabio Fernandes , Cheryl Morgan and Maureen Kincaid Speller, at the web sites Strange Horizons and Tor.com and in LA Review of Books.

Science Fact and Science Fiction

David Southwood showed impressive pictures of the comet 67P taken from the probe Rosetta. He also talked about Wells’ War of the Worlds and how the story of Martians in London was a criticism of Brits in Africa and the wiping out of the Tasmanians. He mentioned the radio adaptation by Orson Welles and recommended a musical starring Richard Burton.

When Dan Dare went to Venus in 1950 the planet was known to have a dense, cloudy atmosphere, and the guess then was that it rained and had tropical forests. Sadly, this has turned out be wrong.

I Am The Law

Melinda Snoddgrass, Liz Zitzov, Simon Bradshaw (M), Francis Davey

Bradshaw introduced the subject by distinguishing three historical origins of law: God’s law, the King’s law and the Common law, the latter being based on how judges have decided before. Most law today are constructed by administration. Other “laws” may be just based on shame, like local laws regarding trespassing cows. In sf Bujold is good on law, but her stories are not especially sf. Women decide on family matters and the tax law is judged by men.  Barry Malzberg is said to write about tax law. Another author who writes about law is Max Gladstone, and in Susanna Clarke’s  Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell there is a court in London for magical issues.

Your Atoms, From Star to Star

This popular scientific talk by Jane Greaves was entertaining and dealt with the formation of atoms and how they have been reformed and recycled several times since the Big Bang.

They Do It Differently

Karoliina Leikomaa, Cristina Macia, Ian Watson (M), Fabio Fernandes, Shaun Duke

Karoliina Leikomaa, Cristina Macia, Ian Watson (M), Fabio Fernandes, Shaun Duke

With Karoliina Leikomaa from Finland, Fabio Fernandes from Brazil, Shaun Duke from Florida and Ian Watson originally from UK but now in Spain together with Cristina Macia this panel could cover a couple of national fandoms. Actually the similarities are more surprising than the differences, and many of the problems are the same. In order to get more young participants at the conventions the fee could be zero for all as in Finland or for just those under 26 as in Sweden.

Thomas Olsson, Martin Andersson, Helena Kiel, Margareta Cronholm

Thomas Olsson, Martin Andersson, Helena Kiel, Margareta Cronholm

During the convention we met a lot of fans from various countries, and the bidding tent for the Helsinki in 2017 bid acted as a meeting point for Scandinavians and others. Still the enormous amount of people (8.000) and the large convention site made me miss several Swedish fans who definitely were there. The fast food area did perhaps not serve the most delicious food but it made it possible to meet other fans at lunch.

Böcker lästa i juli 2014

UnderTidensYtaJonas Ellerström: Under tidens yta.

Med undertiteln ”En annorlunda poesihistoria” är detta en antologi med en dikt av varje av ett stort antal svenska 1900-talspoeter som inte riktigt hör till de mest kända – även om det är svårt med avgränsningen, t ex finns Werner Aspenström och Börje Sandelin med. De bifogade biografierna var utmärkta komplement till dikterna, även om smakproven oftast var för korta för att vara vägledande.

 

skymningssangPatrik Centerwall: Skymningssång.

En samling fantastiknoveller med lätt skräckkaraktär, inte så originella men hyggligt välskrivna och med viss Göteborgsanknytning. Några verkade hänga ihop väl mycket. Tyvärr är boken irriterande dåligt korrekturläst och felaktigt använd äldre verbform stör också.

 

Mothers_and_SonsColm Tóibín: Mothers and Sons.

Utmärkt novellsamling om relationer mellan söner och mödrar i Irland.

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olondria

Sofia Samatar: A Stranger in Olondria.

Jag hade svårt att uppskatta den här fantasyn som har fått mycket beröm. Det kan bero på stilen med långa beskrivande meningar. Jag lyckades i alla fall aldrig bli tillräckligt intresserad av handlingen.

Böcker lästa i juni 2014

Sands of MarsArthur C. Clarke: The Sands of Mars.

Trevlig berättelse om en journalist och sf-författare som följer med till Mars som redan blivit begränsat koloniserat. En sandstorm ser ut som ett berg – men det finns ju inga berg på Mars (detta var före upptäckten av Olympus Mons), och medan de blir hejdade av sandstormen upptäcker de marsianer som odlar växter med syrekapslar.

 

Podkayne1Robert A. Heinlein: Podkayne of Mars.

Egentligen väldigt lite om Mars utan mer om resan till Venus och livet där. Juvenil stil och mossig kvinnosyn gör läsningen måttligt nöjsam. Familjeplaneringen sker genom att nyfödda helt enkelt fryses ner för att tinas upp när det är mer lägligt för karriären.

 

Princess_of_Mars_largeEdgar Rice Burroughs: A Princess of Mars.

Fortfarande klart njutbar äventyrs-sf – eller kanske snarare fantasy för vi får inte veta något om rymdfärden till Mars. Det är t o m oklart om inte allt var en dröm när Carter vaknar upp i samma grotta där han somnade in för att resa till Mars och träffa de olika varelserna där och bli förälskad i den humanoida men äggläggande marsprinsessan.

 

pacificaKjell Rynefors: Pacifica.

Tänkvärda och acceptabelt välskrivna sf-noveller tidigare publicerade huvudsakligen i fanzines, och med illustrationer ur dessa. Utmärkt initiativ att samla ihop och trycka dessa alster av denne Göteborgsfan som tragiskt omkom när han försökte rädda sina barn i en eldsvåda.

Böcker lästa i maj 2014

angpunkantologiAnna Vintersvärd, red: I varje ångetag.

Med undertiteln ”En oscariansk steampunkantologi” är detta en trevlig samling svensk steampunk. Inte minst är den välgjord med snyggt utseende och korrekt språk. Naturligtvis är inte alla bidragen omistliga, och det hade varit bra med en kort presentation av varje författare.

 

minikins-of-yamThomas Burnett Swann: The Minikins of Yam.

Underbart fantasifull historia om en ung farao som utsätts för kuppförsök av sin syster och som klarar av detta med hjälp av gudar och halvmänniskor. Swann i högform.

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BoyeKrisKarin Boye: Kris.

Alltför självömkande historia om en kvinnas religiösa kris och hennes upptäckt av en lesbisk läggning. Varken särskilt framstående miljöskildringar eller personbeskrivningar, och tråkiga insprängda essäer om kristendom.

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Retribution-Falls-finalChris Wooding: Retribution Falls.

Fartfylld underhållande steampunk med intressanta personer, inte minst den mest sympatiska zombie jag stött på. Dessutom kan jag så här efteråt riktigt se bergen och den titelgivande piratstaden. Jag har sedan hört att äventyren är helt identiska med dem man kan se i tv-serien Firefly, men eftersom jag inte sett den gör det ingenting. Äventyren är för övrigt rätt klassiska, och en galen kapten med en märkligt sammansatt besättning har väl setts minst sedan Kapten Frank.

 

60-ar-med-club-cosmosLouise Bengtsson Rylander: Science Fiction i Göteborg. 60 år med Club Cosmos.

Dansk fandom har sin historia berättad av Niels Dalgaard och finsk fandom har varit föremål för en akademisk avhandling av Irma Hirsjärvi. Svensk fandom finns beskriven i Jerry Määttäs bok om sf i Sverige på 50-talet och i ett kapitel i John-Henri Holmbergs stora verk om sf, Inre landskap och yttre rymd. Men nog saknas det en bok om svensk fandom. Det här är i alla fall en bok om fandom i Göteborg, framför allt om Club Cosmos och dess 60 första år. Boken är en samling essäer skrivna av olika författare, men Louise Bengtsson Rylander, andra generationens fan, är medförfattare på de flesta, och det har uppenbarligen bidragit till att boken är mycket trevlig att läsa. Den är dessutom rikt illustrerad med både foton och bilder ur fanzines. Jag har två synpunkter: Göteborgsfandom fick en rejäl skjuts framåt genom Alcocon som i hög grad organiserades av Anna Davour från Uppsala (inte Stockholm). Och jag tror på en förnyelse av fandom genom att vi försöker få med fler och yngre fans som skett i de senaste årens Swecon, en idé som avfärdas i boken. Detta förtar inte på något sätt det beundransvärda i Louises magnifika kulturgärning, att i bokform dokumentera svensk fandoms första klubbs tillkomst och verksamhet. Tack!

 

HarenBärnstensögonEdmund de Waal: Haren med bärnstensögon.

Min far samlade på netsuker, eller netskis som han kallade dem. En samling sådana små japanska figurer, inklusive en hare med bärnstensögon, införskaffades av en judisk familj som skaffade sig en förmögenhet spannmål och bankirverksamhet. Vi får följa familjens öden i flera städer – Odessa, Wien, Paris, Tokyo, och författaren som är en släkting som egentligen är keramiker beskriver hur han rest runt och fått ihop en familjehistoria som samtidigt kretsar runt netsukesamlingen. Naturligtvis är berättelsen stundtals fruktansvärd och en perfekt historielektion. Rekommenderas varmt.

 

martian-chroniclesRay Bradbury: The Martian Chronicles.

Litterärt håller dessa gamla noveller riktigt bra, även om Marsbilden naturligtvis inte är korrekt. Det tror jag heller inte var avsikten när de skrevs. Stämningen är väldigt medelklassamerikansk, 50-tal, ungefär som i Oktoberlandet, och novellerna handlar huvudsakligen om mänskliga relationer även om det förekommer ”riktiga” marsianer i några berättelser. Någon enhetlig bild av marsianer och deras kultur ges inte och novellerna är inte helt kongruenta. Trevlig läsning är det i alla fall fortfarande.

 

kleptomania_HUKristina Hård: Kleptomania.

En döende miljardär berättar för en ung journalist om sitt liv – hur han efter en tågolycka kommer till trollens rike i ett berg och återvänder till platsen för att förse se mig guldet. Pengarna använde han för att starta ett luftskeppsbolag, och det är där steampunken kommer in. Spännande och välskrivet, men det här är bara första delen i en trilogi.

Books read in April 2014

LongEarthTerry Pratchett & Stephen Baxter: The Long Earth.

I liked the comment “…you have now passed my personal Turing test” to the robot/ambulating unit that had equipped itself with a Fedora hat, a holstered revolver and a bull whip. The rest of the book was as dull as I have come to expect from Pratchett. The idea to have a lot of different Earths could have be entertaining but especially due to the boring main male character the story never got off the ground. The others in the book club were less critical.

 

RevoltLisa Rodebrand: Revolt.

It is nice to have your preconceptions roughly overthrown. After having met the timid and kind author I was quite surprised by the amount of violence and high tempo in this Swedish sf debut novel aimed at young adults. Gene-manipulated, extremely strong humans are using ordinary humans as slaves in mines, and this is unknown by people in a space station where some youths hope for help. The story is somewhat complicated and the way the hero always manages to beat the super-strong klykons is not convincing, but the language is good and you are forced to read on. A thrilling contribution, well worth reading, to the small number of contemporary Swedish sf novels!

 

fru-bengtssons-andliga-uppvaknandeCaroline L. Jensen: Fru Bengtssons andliga uppvaknande. (Mrs Bengtsson’s spiritual awakening.)

After having listened to the author at Confetti I was curious and this book was recommended. However, I was somewhat disappointed. The story is a humoristic story about Mrs Bengtsson who drowns by accident in her bathtub but is given a continued life by God. Her neighbour is taken over by the Devil who helps her to break the ten Commandments so that she won’t have to go to heaven when she dies. The characters and philosophy are too shallow to give any meaning to the story.

 

MammothSteampunkSean Wallace, ed.: The Mammoth Book of Steampunk.

A collection of various steampunk stories and an introduction. Some stories were excellent, like the ones by Caitlín R. Kiernan, Cat Rambo, Aliette de Bodard, N. K. Jemisin, Margo Lanagan, Amal El-Mohtar, James Morrow, Mary Robinette Kowal, and Lavie Tidhar.

 

LemFuturologicalStanislaw Lem: The Futurological Congress.

Being first published in 1971, this novel is heavily influenced by mind-altering drugs, distributed by the government in the drinking water. It is also a satire about conventions, and actually a pleasure to read even if it is often difficult to know what is real and what is a dream.


Swecon, Linköping 7-9 augusti

Archipelacon, Åland, 25-28 juni 2015


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